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Hanlon/TibbittsCinemas in Crisis: Contemporary Argentine and Spanish CinemaFall 2011SPAN 320*/CPLT 230/IDST 210Professor Dennis Hanlon and Professor Amy TibbittsMeeting times: MWF 2:00-3:50pmLocation: 134 Hendricks and Writing CenterOffices: Hanlon; 104 Writing CenterTibbitts; 1B WACPhones: Hanlon; x2315Tibbitts; x2080Mailboxes: Hanlon: 265Tibbitts: 121Emails: [email protected]@beloit.eduOffice hours: Hanlon; Mon. & Wed. 10am-12pmTibbitts; Tuesdays 9:30am-12pmCourse Description:Since the early 1980s the cinemas of Spain and Argentina have been joined by more than just acommon language. Both cinemas confronted a legacy of dictatorship, and Argentine cinema’screative engagement with economic crisis at the turn of the new century will most likely influenceSpanish cinema’s response to its own emerging crisis. Financially, Spain has become a major sourceof revenue for Argentine cinema. Aesthetically, what has been called the “New Argentine Cinema”(roughly 1997 on) is regarded in Spain and elsewhere in Europe as a vanguard cinema. While we willbe studying the productions of these two cinemas in relative isolation from each other, underlyingthis course will be a questioning of the category of “national cinema” itself and speculation as towhether “transnational” or, at the very least, “pan-Hispanic” might better describe them. Whileartistic expressions and societal anxieties may differ, as a class we will strive to discover many pointsof convergence.*Note on language: This course is taught entirely in English, although Spanish majors wishing tocount it toward completion of the major will be required to do some reading and complete someassignments in Spanish.Learning Goals: Become familiar with and gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of contemporaryArgentine and Spanish film in their multiple facetsWork through the social, political, and economic pulses that connect and differentiateArgentine and Spanish cinemaInvestigate and question representational ideas of national cinema, nationalism as expressedthrough film, transnational identities, and globalizationLearn how to “read” film from an aesthetic viewpoint and synthesize ideas through writingreflections and critical observationDevelop and hone group discussion techniques and individual presentation skills1

Hanlon/TibbittsRequired Texts:Aguilar, Gonzalo. New Argentine Cinema: Other Worlds. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.*Referred to as OW on schedulePage, Joanna. Crisis and Capitalism in Contemporary Argentine Cinema. Durham: Duke UP,2009. *Referred to as CC on scheduleReadings on Moodle for Prof. TibbittsCourse organization:This course is divided into two groups that will be taught in two 7-week (module) segments. Section1 will have classes with Prof. Hanlon and Section 2 will have classes with Prof. Tibbitts for the first7 weeks after which the groups will switch professors and topics. The final week we will cometogether as a class for final discussion and conclusions. Professor Hanlon will cover contemporaryArgentine cinema and Professor Tibbitts will cover contemporary Spanish cinema. Both sectionswill have similar assignments, exams, and discussions, with the instructors reviewing and agreeing ongrading standards and expectations.All screenings of films will happen in Hendricks 134—Professor Hanlon’s class will screen onWednesdays and Professor Tibbitts’ class will screen on Mondays. Prof. Hanlon’s class will meet inWriting Center’s Seminar Room on Mondays and Fridays; Prof. Tibbitts’ class will meet in theWriting Center Seminar’s room on Wednesdays and HC on Mondays and Fridays. Please makeevery effort to familiarize yourself with the intricacies of the schedule.Calendar:Section 1—HanlonSection 2—TibbittsAug. 31 to Oct. 26Aug. 31-Oct. 26Section 2—HanlonSection 1—TibbittsOct. 28 to Dec. 9Oct. 28 to Dec. 9Final Week (Dec. 12 and 14): Sections 1 and 2 togetherCourse evaluation components:Think Pieces (5% each; 50% of final grade/500 points)—Every student will write 5 Think Piecesduring each module of the course for a total of 10 Think Pieces for the course. These writingexercises should demonstrate 1) integration of assigned readings and lectures and 2) keenobservations of film screenings. Written assignments must be submitted via Moodle.Exams (10% each; 20% of final grade/200 points)—There will be two exams, one at the end ofeach module.Discussion Leaders (5% each time, 10% of the final grade/100 points)—Each student will beresponsible to lead a discussion on either a reading or film in each of the sections.2

Hanlon/TibbittsParticipation (5% for each section, 10% of the final grade/100 points)—Active, positive, attentive,and consistent participation is a crucial component of the course.Final Film Conference (10% of the final grade/100 points): During the final exam period,students will organize panels in which they discuss their research on two (or more) films seenoutside of class. The films should be both Spanish and Argentine. The goal of the panel is to makecross-cultural connections with the films.Point Distribution:A 940-1000A- 900-939B 870-899B 830-869B- 800-829C 770-799C 730-769C- 700-729D 630-699D 600-629F below 600Course norms:Attendance: Class attendance is mandatory. You may miss three classes throughout the semester.However, after missing a forth class, your FINAL grade will be dropped the next lowest letter gradewith every subsequent absence (e.g. A- with four absences B ; A- with five absences B; A- withsix absences B-, etc.). More then 9 absences will result in a failing grade for the course. Keep inmind that any absence will negatively affect your participation grade. Please inform your instructorvia email if you plan on being absent or unexpectedly miss a class. Any special exceptions to theattendance policy must be discussed in person with one or more of the instructor and will begranted only in rare and unforeseen circumstances.Participation: Your active participation is required. Active participation means being in class andmaking relevant and verbal contributions during each class discussion. Keep in mind that askingpertinent questions is a form of active participation. A positive and respectful attitude towards theinstructors, peers, and our collective intellectual effort is required at all times and imperative to asuccessful participation grade. Please turn off cell phone during class. You will not be allowedto have a laptop out during class.Arriving on time: It is a requirement of the course that you arrive to class on time, and ideallysomewhat before the official start time. Arriving late to class is rude and disruptive to instructorsand fellow peers. NOTE: Three late arrivals to class is the equivalent of an absence.Turning in work: All assignments must be turned in on time, on the date indicated. No late workwill be accepted.Exams: Exams must be taken on the scheduled date. No make-up exams will be administered.Please arrange your schedule accordingly.Think Pieces: Students will write five “Think Pieces” for each section, for a total of 10. Studentsmust complete the first “Think Piece” assigned and may not skip two in a row. “Think Pieces” willbe evaluated on strength of ideas presented, incorporation of readings, organization, and languageuse. “Think Pieces” are to be turned in via Moodle on or before the indicated time. No late paperswill be accepted.3

Hanlon/TibbittsDiscussion leaders: Students will act as discussion leaders once during each section (i.e. twiceduring the semester, lasting approximately ½ hour). DLs are responsible for guiding the classthrough the salient components of the readings, presenting questions that help the class deepen itsunderstanding of the texts and the films, and fostering an atmosphere of exploration. Successfulleaders will demonstrate a high level of preparation and incorporate the instructor as a participant inthe discussion, as opposed to having the instructor “carry” the class through discussion. Thosestudents who are not in the position of DL have the responsibility to come prepared and ready todiscuss.Moodle: The course relies heavily on the use of Moodle. It is the expectation that students havefrequent access to the Moodle site.Email: Email is a useful tool for clarifying homework assignments, making announcementsconcerning changes to the schedule, sending out reminders, etc. However, any concerns regardingperformance in the course, level of participation, grades, personal issues, need to be discussed inperson with one or both of the instructors. Also, be advised that replies to questions will not beautomatic. The instructors will respond to emails with 24 hours on a weekday and 48 hours on aweekend.Notes on films:Film content: Many of the films we will see in class are rated R or not rated at all. These films maycontain any or all of the following R-rated material: extreme violence, offensive language, male andfemale nudity, drug use, and sex. If for any reason you feel uncomfortable or offended by this kind of content,please discuss the issue with your instructor on the first day of class, but advised that it will not be possible to findalternative screenings for you.Screenings: It is the expectation that every effort will be made to attend screenings of films.Missing a screening is the same as missing a class and will count against both the attendance policyand your participation grade. If you happen to miss a screening, it is the responsibility of thestudent to make all arrangements to screen the film on his or her own time and to turn in all workrelated to the film on its assigned due date. It is unreasonable to expect instructors to arrange extrascreenings outside of class time.How to watch a film actively: It is required that students take notes about the film while the filmis being screened. These notes will be useful when studying for exams as well as when writing“Think Pieces” and remembering important details such as characters’ names, basic plot, use ofsymbolism, et cetera.Courtesy notice: Since we will be watching most films in Spanish and concentrating on the film as apiece of artistic and intellectual expression (rather than solely as entertainment), it is essential thatthe classroom environment remains free from distractions. Therefore, please restrain from talkingto your classmates or discussing aspects of the film while the film is being shown. Remember toturn off your cell phone or any other electronic device that makes noise during the entire durationof the class.4

Hanlon/TibbittsStudent Rights and Responsibilities:A basic tenet of higher education is that the classroom is a place for the free expression of ideas. Beaware that you may neither share nor agree with all of the opinions expressed in class, but pleaserespect the right for contrasting opinions to be expressed. As a student at Beloit College you alsohave the right to a safe and productive classroom environment – free from distraction,discrimination, or harassment – and rooted in civility. Actions that disrupt this environment willresult in expulsion from the classroom.Your responsibilities include the timely completion of assignments for the class and familiarizingyourself with the rules and deadlines listed on the syllabus. We recognize your abilities to makeinformed decisions and expect that you will decide the best course of action when it comes to yourown studies. Sometimes this means deciding what can and cannot get done in a reasonable periodof time and being responsible for the choices you make. Also recognize that according to yourFERPA rights, we are only able to discuss your work with you, so please see me about any questionsand do not ask family members to intervene on your behalf.Instructors’ Statement:The syllabus is subject to change owing to class progress, time constraints, or material (esp. DVD)availability. You will be notified of any changes in the syllabus in a timely fashion. Please feel freeto talk to us about issues, concerns, or problems that may come up during the semester, and wepromise that we will work together to achieve an amicable solution.ACADEMIC DISHONESTYAny student participating in academic dishonesty at any point of the course will receive a finalgrade of F or No Pass. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating onassignments, quizzes, and exams, fabrication or falsification of research, copying information fromany source (including materials from the internet) and representing it as your own, submitting thesame or substantially similar papers for more than one course without knowledge or permission ofall instructors, or deliberately depriving another of necessary course materials.Special needs:If you have a disability and would like to discuss the possibility of accommodations, contact theLearning Enrichment and Disability Services Office located on 2nd floor Pearsons (north side) orcall x: 2572 or email [email protected] If you need accommodations in this class, you must bringus an Accommodation Verification Letter from the Director of that office and then we will discussspecifically how to meet your needs. Please contact that office promptly, accommodations are notretroactive.Free peer tutoring is available for most classes. If you would like a tutor, apply at the LearningEnrichment and Disability Services Office located on 2nd floor Pearsons (north side) during theiroffice hours (8 am - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday).5

Hanlon/TibbittsSPAN 320.01 (CPLT 231.01, IDST 210.01) Cinemas of Crisis: Contemporary Spanish andArgentine FilmFall 2011Class Schedule—Section One—Argentine CinemaThis Group will meet MF in the Writing Center Seminar Room and W in HCA 132 weeks 1-7.Readings: indicates readings due by that date. Screening: indicates a film shown in its entirety.Film: indicates films that we will be watching clips from in class. OW indicates Other Worldsand CC indicates Crisis and Capitalism in New Argentine Cinema. PDFs available on Moodle.Links to OL (online) material on Moodle.Week 1 Introduction to New Argentine Cinema8/31Course Objectives and SyllabusScreening:Sábado (Juan Villegas, Arg., 2001)9/2Readings:Oubniña, David. “Between Breakup and Tradition: Recent Argentinean Cinema” OLFalicov, Tamara L. The Cinematic Tango: Contemporary Argentine Film (London:Wallflower Press, 2007). Chapter 4, “Young Filmmakers and New IndependentArgentine Cinema.” PDFScreening:Pizza, birra, faso (Pizza, Beer, and Cigarettes, Adrián Caetano and Bruno Stagnaro, Arg.,1997)Week 2 Nomadic Cinema, Youth and the Family9/5Readings:CC 1-19, 34-43; OW 183-207Film:Rapado (Shaved, Martín Retjman, Arg., 1992)9/7Screening:Mundo grúa (Crane World, Pablo Trapero, Arg., 1999)9/9Readings:OW 117-146; CC 48-56Film:Familia rodante (Rolling Family, Pablo Trapero, Arg., 2004)Week 3 Sedentary Cinema: The Family and Other Institutions in Crisis9/12Readings:CC 180-194; OW 7-31Films:6

Hanlon/TibbittsEl bonaerense (Pablo Trapero, Arg., 2002)La niña santa (The Holy Girl, Lucrecia Martel, Arg., 2004)9/14Screening:La ciénega (The Swamp, Lucrecia Martel, Arg., 2001)9/16Readings:OW 33-59, 83-92Week 4 Nation and Immigration9/19Reading:CC 110-151Films:Bar, el Chino (Daniel Burak, Arg., 2003)El viaje (The Journey, Fernando E. Solanas, Arg., 1992)Historias minimas (Intimate Stories, Carlos Sorin, Arg., 2002)Bombón: el perro (Carlos Sorin, Arg., 2004)9/21Screening:Bolivia (Adrián Caetano, Arg., 2001)9/23Readings:OW 146-155; CC 57-68Week 5 The Slow Cinema of Lisandro Alonso9/26Readings:West, Dennis and Joan M. West. “Cinema Beyond Words: An Interview with LisandroAlonso” PDFKlinger, Gabe. “Lisandro Alonso, Mostly in His Own Words” OLFilm:La libertad (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2001)9/28Screening:Los muertos (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2004)Fantasma (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2006)9/30Reading:OW 60-74Film:Liverpool (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2008)Week 6 Globalization and Circulation10/3Readings:CC 68-80; OW 74-83Film:7

Hanlon/TibbittsSylvia Prieto (Martín Retjman, Arg., 1999)10/5Screening:Los guantes mágicos (The Magic Gloves, Martín Retjman, Arg., 2003)10/7Reading:Ross, Miriam. South American Cinematic Culture: Policy, Production, Distribution, andExhibition (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2010), Chapter Three,“International Interests” PDFWeek 7 Chance, Comedy10/10 Screening:Tan de repente (Suddenly, Diego Lerman, Arg., 2002)10/12 Readings:OW 101-109A Selection of Articles on New Argentine Cinema from Trade PublicationsSuárez, Pablo. “A Road Movie with a Difference: Suddenly Announces the Arrival of aNew Argentine Breakthrough” PDFde la Fuente, Anna Marie. “Latin Biz Thrives as Local Pic Funds Mature” PDFCorless, Kieron. “Latin Massive” PDFHopewell, John and Emilio Mayorga. “Ventana Sur says boom” PDFMatheou, Demetrios. “Keeping the New Wave Rolling” PDFSuárez, Pablo. “Amidst Political Chaos, Social Instability, and Economic Meltdown, TheNew Argentine Cinema Continues to Bear Witness” PDFHopewell, John. “Argentine pix speak to new Spanish auds” PDF10/14 Exam on New Argentine CinemaWeek 15 The Politics and Aesthetics of Co-productions12/12 Screening:Martín (Hache) (Martin H, Adolfo Aristarain, Arg./Spain, 1997)12/13 Readings:Hoefert de Turégano, Teresa, “The International Politics of Cinematic Coproduction:Spanish Policy in Latin America” PDFVillazana, Libia, “Hegemony Conditions in the Coproduction Cinema of LatinAmerica:The Role of Spain” PDFFinal Exam Meeting Time12/17, 9-128

Hanlon/TibbittsSPAN 320.01 (CPLT 231.01, IDST 210.01) Cinemas of Crisis: Contemporary Spanish andArgentine FilmFall 2011Class Schedule—Section Two—Argentine CinemaThis Group will meet MF in the Writing Center Seminar Room and W in HCA 132 weeks 8-14.Readings: indicates readings due by that date. Screening: indicates a film shown in its entirety.Film: indicates films that we will be watching clips from in class. OW indicates Other Worldsand CC indicates Crisis and Capitalism in New Argentine Cinema. PDFs available on Moodle.Links to OL (online) material on Moodle.Week 8 Introduction to New Argentine Cinema10/24 Reading:Oubniña, David. “Between Breakup and Tradition: Recent Argentinean Cinema” OL10/26 Screening:Pizza, birra, faso (Pizza, Beer, and Cigarettes, Adrián Caetano and Bruno Stagnaro, Arg.,1997)10/28 Reading:Falicov, Tamara L. The Cinematic Tango: Contemporary Argentine Film (London:Wallflower Press, 2007). Chapter 4, “Young Filmmakers and New IndependentArgentine Cinema.” PDFWeek 9 Nomadic Cinema, Youth and the Family10/31 Readings:CC 1-19, 34-43; OW 183-207Film:Rapado (Shaved, Martín Retjman, Arg., 1992)11/2Screening:Mundo grúa (Crane World, Pablo Trapero, Arg., 1999)11/4Readings:OW 117-146; CC 48-56Film:Familia rodante (Rolling Family, Pablo Trapero, Arg., 2004)Week 10 Sedentary Cinema, the Family and Other Institutions in Crisis11/7Readings:CC 180-194; OW 7-31Films:El bonaerense (Pablo Trapero, Arg., 2002)9

Hanlon/TibbittsLa niña santa (The Holy Girl, Lucrecia Martel, Arg., 2004)11/9Screening:La ciénega (The Swamp, Lucrecia Martel, Arg., 2001)11/11 Readings:OW 33-59, 83-92Week 11 The Slow Cinema of Lisandro Alonso11/14 Readings:West, Dennis and Joan M. West. “Cinema Beyond Words: An Interview with LisandroAlonso” PDFKlinger, Gabe. “Lisandro Alonso, Mostly in His Own Words” OLFilm:La libertad (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2001)11/16 Screening:Los muertos (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2004)Fantasma (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2006)11/18 Reading:OW 60-74Film:Liverpool (Lisandro Alonso, Arg., 2008)Week 12 Nation and Immigration11/21 Readings:OW 146-155; CC 57-68, 110-151Films:Bar, el Chino (Daniel Burak, Arg., 2003)El viaje (The Journey, Fernando E. Solanas, Arg., 1992)Historias minimas (Intimate Stories, Carlos Sorin, Arg., 2002)Bombón: el perro (Carlos Sorin, Arg., 2004)11/23 Screening:Bolivia (Adrián Caetano, Arg., 2001)11/25 Thanksgiving Break—No ClassWeek 13 Globalization and Circulation11/28 Readings:CC 68-80; OW 74-83Film:Sylvia Prieto (Martí